Sequoia/King's Canyon: A Land of Giants

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"This landscape testifies to nature's size, beauty, and diversity - huge mountains, rugged foothills, deep canyons, vast caverns, and the world's largest trees." National Park Service

Sequoia and King's Canyon National Parks are sister parks in the southern Sierra Nevada. On the National Park website, they are lumped in together and I have a hard time remembering which sites are in which park. Home to the world's largest trees and some of the deepest canyons in the world, these parks are often overshadowed by their more famous neighbor Yosemite.

There are also marmots.

Getting There

The National Park Service warns travelers not to rely on GPS as they are not reliable in this area.

Getting to Sequoia/King's Canyon is not a difficult enterprise, especially in the summer. In the winter be prepared to be bring snow chains and know that roads are suspect to closure. There is no through highway connecting the east and west sides of the park.

Highway 180 east from Fresno enters the Grant Grove area of Kings Canyon National Park, then continues 30 miles east to the Cedar Grove area. Highway 180 ends 6 miles east of Cedar Grove.

Highway 198 enters Sequoia National Park from the southwest via Three Rivers.

Places of Interest

The park can be divided into five distinct regions: Foothills, Mineral King, Giant Forest/Lodgepole, Grant Grove, and Cedar Grove. Mineral King and Cedar Grove areas are only accessible in the summer, but the other three areas are open year round. I've explored Giant Forest/Lodgepole and Grant Grove areas in both summer and winter. In this post I will be focusing on Giant Forest/Lodgepole in the summer.

Giant Forest/Lodgepole

This region of the park is home to many of the world's largest trees. It makes up the largest area of the park and is an excellent area for hiking of all levels, snowshoeing, and cross-country skiing. The National Park Service recommends the Giant Forest Museum (summer only), General Sherman Tree, Sentinel Tree, Moro Rock, Tunnel Log, Crescent Meadow, and Crystal Cave. Being the winner I am, I have not been to any of these sights. Crystal Cave and Moro Rock have been on my to do list for a while; I will definitely be checking them out on my next visit.

Alta Peak Hike

A couple of years ago I obsessed over the website summitpost.org and peak bagging. It was on this website that Alta Peak caught my eye. Described as a relatively easy, accessible, but fairly high peak at over 11,000 feet, it seemed like a perfect warm up to something bigger. It still remains the highest mountain that I've climbed.

The sign for Alta Peak Trail.

While Alta Peak can easily be done as a day hike, my climbing partner and I were coming from the San Francisco Bay Area and wanted to take our time with the hike. Our main concern was the elevation difference between our starting point, Santa Cruz, and our destination, so we planned our trip as an overnight backpacking trip. If you are camping in the backcountry you need to stop at Lodgepole Visitor Center and get a $15 backpacking permit. During the quota period (May 22, 2015 through September 26, 2015), rangers limit the number of backpackers per trailhead. From here we drove to the Alta Trail head at Wolverton.

There are plenty of water sources on the way in the guise of streams. Make sure you bring plenty of water and a way to purify water from natural sources. I typically go with iodine tablets which take about thirty minutes to purify, are small and light, and easy to use; they do have a funky taste to some people. The trail is fairly steep on the way up to Panther Gap, which is the first great vista along this trail.

The view from Panther Gap.

From Panther Gap continue up the trail. The trail hugs the side of a mountain and it's a long way down. At one point I lost my balance and tripped, nearly tumbling 6,000 feet down. There are plenty of rock formations, wildflowers, and birds. I kept thinking this would be a great place to go rock climbing, though I'm not sure if I would want to haul all the gear up there.

By the way, this area of the park is not where you will find the giant trees. The sub-alpine meadows, granite rock formations, and distant snowy peaks remind me of Yosemite.

At around five miles in we came to Mehrten Meadow, a beautiful wildflower filled meadow at 9,140 feet. We set up camp close between the trail and a burbling creek. There are few places I can imagine more idyllic for a campsite. We ate a dinner of jerky, a couple of backpacking meals, and hot cocoa. The temperatures drop quickly at this altitude even in the summer so make sure to bring layers.

On the trail to Alta Peak

The last two miles were steep and challenging, crossing over icy snow, rocky terrain, and sneaky marmots; they don't want to be seen, but we spotted a couple. Crossing icy snow was a new experience for me and Ryan walked me through it. On our June trip, the last part of the trail was covered by snow and we carefully made our way up to the top.

After trudging up the snow, we were rewarded with a panoramic vista of the Kaweah Range and Pear Lake. They are absolutely stunning and absolutely worth it.

View from the top of the peak.

We snapped a couple of photos at the top, got bothered by bees and attempted to spot a marmot or two. My favorite part of the hike was the controlled butt slide I took back down the trail from the top. So much fun!

Alta Peak Hike 3

 

Between the giant trees, grand vistas, and jagged peaks, Sequoia/King's Canyon is a must see for a peak bagger, day tripper, or car tourist. I can't wait until I can go back for Moro Rock. And marmots.