Yosemite: Celebrate 125 Years at Tuolumne Meadows!

"Not just a great valley, but a shrine to human foresight, the strength of granite, the power of glaciers, the persistence of life, and the tranquility of the High Sierra." --National Park Service

What more can be said of Yosemite that has not already been done a thousand times by people much more eloquent than I?

The most well known of all the National Parks, Yosemite is one of the great destinations on the planet. While it does not draw in the highest number of visitors, that award would go to the Great Smoky Mountains Park, more than three million visitors a year come to see the enormous granite walls, stunning waterfalls, and tranquil meadows of this Sierra Mountain park. It celebrates its 125th year as a National Park in October 2015. Congratulations Yosemite!

Getting There

Getting to Yosemite depends on what time of year you are going and which direction you are coming from. Always make sure to check road conditions before leaving to make sure the road you want to use is open. The National Park Service recommends not relying on your GPS, as GPS can be unreliable in the park.

San Francisco/Bay area Distance: 195 mi / 314 km Time:4-5 hours Take I-580 east to I-205 east to Highway 120 east (Manteca) or Highway 140 east (Merced) into Yosemite National Park.

Sacramento Distance: 176 mi / 283 km Time: 4 hours Take Highway 99 south to Highway 120 east (Manteca) or Highway 140 east (Merced) into Yosemite National Park

Reno & Lake Tahoe Approximately June through October, conditions permitting Distance: 218 mi / 351 km (Reno) Time: 5 hours Take US 395 south to Lee Vining; take Highway 120 west into Yosemite National Park (open late May/June through October, depending on conditions).

All year Distance: 315 mi / 507 km (Reno) Time: 8 hours Take I-80 or I-50 west to Sacramento; take Highway 99 south to Highway 120 east (Manteca) or Highway 140 east (Merced) into Yosemite National Park.

Los Angeles area Distance: 313 mi / 504 km Time: 6 hours Take I-5 north (or I-405 north to I-5) to Highway 99 north to Highway 41 north (Fresno) into Yosemite National Park.

San Diego area Distance: 441 mi / 710 km Time: 8 hours Take I-5 north to Highway 99 to Highway 41 north (Fresno) into Yosemite National Park.

Las Vegas June through October, conditions permitting Distance: 400 mi / 642 km Time: 8 hours Take US-95 North to Tonopah, then US-95/US-6 west to Highway 120. Go west on Highway 120 into Yosemite National Park (open late May/early June through October, depending on conditions).

November through May Distance: 495 mi / 797 km Time: 8-10 hours Take I-15 south to Barstow; Highway 58 west to Bakersfield; take Highway 99 north to Fresno. In Fresno, take Highway 41 north into Yosemite National Park.

Places of Interest

There is so much to see and do in Yosemite that is impossible to get to everything in one visit even if you stay an entire week. While the large granite walls of El Capitan and Half Dome are stunning from the valley floor, the sub-alpine meadows and crystalline lakes of Tuolumne Meadows are my favorite places in the park.

Tuolumne Meadows

Tuolumne Meadows is a sub-alpine meadow located on the eastern side of the park. While it is definitively less crowded than the valley, it sees plenty of visitors and its campground fills up fast. Tuolumne, for me, is not so much a destination in itself but a gateway to the wilderness beyond.

Rock studded meadows on the trail to Young Lake

Lembert Dome

This area of the park is studded with domes and Lembert Dome is one of the most impressive. It stands out from the meadows and is a short hike from the road. We passed by it on our backpacking trip to Young Lake in 2012. Beware of the mosquitos.

In front of Lembert Dome on our 2012 backpacking trip.

Young Lakes

If you're planning a trip out to Young Lakes, there are three of them, and want to camp remember to get a wilderness permit at Tuolumne Meadow Visitor Center. It's important to get there early as the number of permits is limited.

To get to Young Lakes, take the Young Lake trail via Dog Lake. It's about six miles to the first of the lakes and along the way you will walk through alpine forests, sub-alpine meadows, and enjoy panoramic views of granite peaks. Remember to bring plenty of water and mind the altitude as this trail takes you above ten thousand feet and is fairly arduous. We got lost a couple of times going around a ridge and if it weren't for my knowledge of cairns, we would have continued going around in circles for a lot longer.

Young Lake and Ragged Peak

We camped out at the first lake of the Young Lakes. From here you can see Ragged Peak above the lake. It was incredibly beautiful, but the mosquitos drove us insane and the altitude was giving us each a headache. My friend had never set up his backpacking tent before, so that was quite a travail.

The next morning we hiked up to the next two lakes, which host some pretty abundant waterfalls.

Waterfall at Upper Young Lake

My friend sitting at the top of the waterfall

Delaney Meadows

Our trip was initially planned to be two nights, but neither of us slept due to altitude sickness and we decided to pack it in after exploring for a couple hours around the lake. On our way back we passed through the Delaney Meadows, which required creek fording (one of my favorite things to do). We came across a number of people hiking through this area, though most of our hike the day before had been in isolation.

Delaney Meadows. Mosquitos abound.

When we got back to the car we were exhausted and ready for the four drive back to the bay. Strangely, a banana that we had left on the trunk of the car was still there. Oops.

Tuolumne Meadows is serene and beautiful, a much different experience in the summer than the valley. Just don't forget the bug repellant.